A note about Fang’s Scion Exchange App

You have to enter either Wants or Offers into the app to get the Exchange page to generate.   And don’t forget to click Update at the bottom of the page after entering your Wants and/or Offers.

Thank you to the members who have already done so.  The rest of you, get pruning!  With this crazy January weather, my apples are already leafing out…

 

 

Photo by Olga Thelavart on Unsplash

Scion Exchange 2022

With the ongoing surge of COVID-19 cases in LA County, and the fact that Culver City has closed its schools, the odds of our having a traditional scion exchange this year are starting to look slim.  Fortunately, Fang has reactivated the Scion Exchange app he built last year so we can start posting our Offers and Wants now.  If the rate of hospitalizations and deaths stays the same, we will use the format we did last year.  IE folks can drop any OFFERS requested on Saturday February 12th at my driveway (labelled please!) . I will sort them and make them available for pickup by the WANTERS on Sunday February 13th.  There is a place on the app to work out these exchanges ahead of time and please do so.

Of course, if COVID miraculously goes into retreat, we can do the exchange of Offers and Wants all in one morning on the outdoor patio of our beloved MutliPurpose Room.   We would still need to be masked and respect social distancing.

This year, as was true last year, the Exchange will unfortunately only be open to the West LA Chapter.  The link to Fang’s app has been sent to all current members. If you didn’t receive it, please let us know.

Also please stay tuned for updates. Circumstances can change on a daily basis.

 

Photo by Luke White on Unsplash

Saturday, October 9th @ 10 a.m. Greenhouses and other Great Stuff for growing fruit

Ahead of the holiday gifting season, we thought we would ask you all to share your favorite Fruit Growing Stuff (you know, so we can add it to our lists).

At our last meeting, Charles told us how he goes commando and does all his propagating outdoors.  But some of us are trying to propagate tropicals that require more humidity than SoCal offers. So Bruce will be telling us about the nifty greenhouse in which he resurrected Eric Durtschi’s struggling cacao seedlings and now has dozens of coffee plants building strength for our holiday sale.

I will offer my much humbler (and cheaper)  greenhouse currently housing 11 cacao seedlings and 1 yang mei seedling.  I will also reveal a great source for horticultural sand (100 pounds for $10!)

Jane will be telling us about her wondrous little electric shredder and her equally wonderous compost bins.

Margaret may be telling us about her metal hoses (or who knows what else lurks in the heart of her garden?).

And any of you who want to offer up your favorite discoveries, please do so.  If you want to get  on the Official Participant list, just Contact Us.  Though of course there will be opportunities to join the gabfest as the spirit moves you.

This was supposed to be our November, first post-Pandemic in person meeting but our October field trip has now been moved to November.  So this will be again on Zoom.  Links will be provided in your newsletter.

September 18th (NOTE DATE CHANGE!) @ 10 am: Charles Portney on Propagating Fruit Trees

Okay, you clamored for this and now —  at long length —  we can deliver!   Yes, Charles Portney on propagating fruit trees.

A good number of you first became members because of the bounty of our plant sales and many of those plants were provided by the inimitable – and generous — Charles .  On September 18th, he will take you behind the scenes and teach you how he works his magic.  You do not want to miss this meeting!

Because of the Delta Variant, we are still meeting virtually.  You will receive the Zoom links in your newsletter. If you are not a chapter member, but wish to attend, please contact us.

Photo by おにぎり on Unsplash

Talk by Fritz Maslan, Saturday June 12th @ 10 am

The National Park Service is resurrecting historic orchards. And Fritz Maslan is going to tell us all about it

The orchards of the Fruita Rural Historic District (in the Capitol Reef National Park, South Utah)  are one of the largest ongoing cultivated orchards in the national park system and remain an important part of the region’s rich history and cultural heritage. The orchards were planted by early pioneers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, beginning in the 1880s,  and currently contain approximately 2,000 fruit trees including numerous heirloom varieties.

Fritz Maslan is the  Horticulturist at Capitol Reef and is intimately involved in this long term orchard  restoration project which will begin with the Guy Smith and Cook orchards and – building  on what is learned there – will ultimately involve the other  17 orchards within the park.  He has his work cut out for him, however, since over the past fifty years, the  orchards have lost almost 1,000 trees and with continued losses expected due to age, disease and nutrient deficiencies, the improvement of  the land  along with replanting is needed to maintain orchard historic integrity.

While we, of course, are interested in how and what will be planted in Fruita, Fritz is also interested in what he can learn from us about growing difficult fruit trees.  While this is not one of our normal single-plant-centric talks, it is sure to be fascinating.  Don’t miss it!

Members will receive a Zoom link in their newsletter.  If you are interested in joining us, please contact us at crfgwla@gmail.com

 

Talk by Fritz Maslan, Saturday June 12th @ 10 am

The National Park Service is resurrecting historic orchards. And Fritz Maslan is going to tell us all about it

The orchards of the Fruita Rural Historic District (in the Capitol Reef National Park, South Utah)  are one of the largest ongoing cultivated orchards in the national park system and remain an important part of the region’s rich history and cultural heritage. The orchards were planted by early pioneers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, beginning in the 1880s,  and currently contain approximately 2,000 fruit trees including numerous heirloom varieties.

Fritz Maslan is the  Horticulturist at Capitol Reef and is intimately involved in this long term orchard  restoration project which will begin with the Guy Smith and Cook orchards and – building  on what is learned there – will ultimately involve the other  17 orchards within the park.  He has his work cut out for him, however, since over the past fifty years, the  orchards have lost almost 1,000 trees and with continued losses expected due to age, disease and nutrient deficiencies, the improvement of  the land  along with replanting is needed to maintain orchard historic integrity.

While we, of course, are interested in how and what will be planted in Fruita, Fritz is also interested in what he can learn from us about growing difficult fruit trees.  While this is not one of our normal single-plant-centric talks, it is sure to be fascinating.  Don’t miss it!

Members will receive a Zoom link in their newsletter.  If you are interested in joining us, please contact us at crfgwla@gmail.com

 

Talk by Fritz Maslan, Saturday June 12th @ 10 am

The National Park Service is resurrecting historic orchards. And Fritz Maslan is going to tell us all about it

The orchards of the Fruita Rural Historic District (in the Capitol Reef National Park, South Utah)  are one of the largest ongoing cultivated orchards in the national park system and remain an important part of the region’s rich history and cultural heritage. The orchards were planted by early pioneers of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, beginning in the 1880s,  and currently contain approximately 2,000 fruit trees including numerous heirloom varieties.

Fritz Maslan is the  Horticulturist at Capitol Reef and is intimately involved in this long term orchard  restoration project which will begin with the Guy Smith and Cook orchards and – building  on what is learned there – will ultimately involve the other  17 orchards within the park.  He has his work cut out for him, however, since over the past fifty years, the  orchards have lost almost 1,000 trees and with continued losses expected due to age, disease and nutrient deficiencies, the improvement of  the land  along with replanting is needed to maintain orchard historic integrity.

While we, of course, are interested in how and what will be planted in Fruita, Fritz is also interested in what he can learn from us about growing difficult fruit trees.  While this is not one of our normal single-plant-centric talks, it is sure to be fascinating.  Don’t miss it!

Members will receive a Zoom link in their newsletter.  If you are interested in joining us, please contact us at crfgwla@gmail.com

 

September 12th – 10 am: Fabulous Zoom field trip to Point Dume Orchard

Exactly two years ago, our chapter made a memorable visit to a member’s huge orchard out at Point Dume.  Attendance was strictly limited and many of you were disappointed not to be able to see the wondrous array of exotic trees and wildlife that Arnie has been patiently tending for years (and brought safely through  the Woolsey Fire that totally surrounded it two months after our visit. )

This year, however, thanks to COVID19, you can see the orchard in all its glory… virtually.

Check your member’s newsletter for the Zoom links.  We are still working on getting an unlimited Zoom license but for the time being our Zoom meetings are restricted to members.  Because we have so many new members since our Plant Sale, our spreadsheet may be a little out of date.  If you don’t receive your newsletter within a few days, please let us know.

September 12th – 10 am: Fabulous Zoom field trip to Point Dume Orchard

Exactly two years ago, our chapter made a memorable visit to a member’s huge orchard out at Point Dume.  Attendance was strictly limited and many of you were disappointed not to be able to see the wondrous array of exotic trees and wildlife that Arnie has been patiently tending for years (and brought safely through  the Woolsey Fire that totally surrounded it two months after our visit. )

This year, however, thanks to COVID19, you can see the orchard in all its glory… virtually.

Check your member’s newsletter for the Zoom links.  We are still working on getting an unlimited Zoom license but for the time being our Zoom meetings are restricted to members.  Because we have so many new members since our Plant Sale, our spreadsheet may be a little out of date.  If you don’t receive your newsletter within a few days, please let us know.

September 12th – 10 am: Fabulous Zoom field trip to Point Dume Orchard

Exactly two years ago, our chapter made a memorable visit to a member’s huge orchard out at Point Dume.  Attendance was strictly limited and many of you were disappointed not to be able to see the wondrous array of exotic trees and wildlife that Arnie has been patiently tending for years (and brought safely through  the Woolsey Fire that totally surrounded it two months after our visit. )

This year, however, thanks to COVID19, you can see the orchard in all its glory… virtually.

Check your member’s newsletter for the Zoom links.  We are still working on getting an unlimited Zoom license but for the time being our Zoom meetings are restricted to members.  Because we have so many new members since our Plant Sale, our spreadsheet may be a little out of date.  If you don’t receive your newsletter within a few days, please let us know.

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